Introducing EYE-SYNC

60-seconds to objective, data-driven clinical decisions.

FDA-cleared tool

The first FDA-approved device to assess ocular-motor synchronization, EYE-SYNC is also HIPAA compliant and backed by 15 years of clinical research.

Fast, objective results

Portable and compact, EYE-SYNC gives results in under 60 seconds so clinicians can make critical, informed decisions on the spot.

Clear communication tool

When uncertainty can be high, EYE-SYNC gives clinicians intuitive and visual displays to easily communicate with patients.

Ongoing accuracy

Because it is not affected by learning bias or effort, clinicians can reliably repeat EYE-SYNC following initial assessment to monitor the pace of recovery.

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Comprehensive platform

In addition to its proprietary ocular motor assessment, EYE-SYNC offers clinicians the full range of tests needed to fully assess for all concussion sub-types to observe all aspects of recovery.

Improve attention focus

By using EYE-SYNC to baseline individuals’ attention focus, EYE-SYNC acts as a performance measure which can be improved upon through training.

Monitor fatigue

EYE-SYNC is able to identify and measure signs of fatigue or poor sleep quality, providing actionable insights for professionals to augment training workload, volume, and intensity in an effort to promote recovery.

Manage workload for ideal performance

EYE-SYNC can be used for as a proactive monitoring technology to guide individual training capacity.

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How EYE-SYNC works

For us to pay active attention to the world around us, the brain must constantly predict incoming information. The 0.25 second delay between receiving information and acting requires us to predict and synchronize our behavior in order to process in real-time. Synchronization is critical to stay safe and perform a task optimally. However, when a brain injury occurs, we are no longer able to predict or pay attention.

With EYE-SYNC Eye Tracking, an individual watches a target in circular motion. The test is not trying to stress or confuse the user; rather, it aims to create the most predictable environment possible. The test then measures the user’s eye motion and characterizes how well it synchronizes with the moving target across two synchronization metrics: radial (or spatial) variability and tangential (or timing) variability.

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What the results indicate

After completing the EYE-SYNC ocular-motor assessment, the clinician receives a report with metrics measuring the individual’s radial (or spatial) variability and tangential (or timing) variability, as well as the error mean position of the eye compared to the target.

When there is a clear pattern of spatial accuracy and cycle-by-cycle consistency, the individual is unlikely to have an ocular-motor impairment. Other patterns will indicate an individual with a clear ocular-motor impairment, often demonstrating unique patterns for concussion or sleep deprivation impairments. Further, the report includes shows an individual’s scores compared to normative results, which can also be used to chart improvement over time.

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The concussion
screening algorithm

Adapted from Stanford Sports Medicine’s concussion protocol, the EYE-SYNC Screening Algorithm gives clear guidance on the actions to be taken following a suspected concussive event. Based on the latest research that ocular-motor and vestibular-balance impairments account for most neurological dysfunction, the protocol first assesses for those impairments. In so doing, the potential risk of further injury is decreased.

Case studies from the sidelines

image description utilizes objective metrics for ocular-motor impairments

component assessment tool Result
Ocular-motor impairment EYE-SYNC Eye Tracking Abnormal – removed from play
Vestibular-balance dysfunction EYE-SYNC Vestibular
Cognitive fatigue EYE-SYNC SCAT5
Cervical Spine Clinical Assessment of Cervical Spine
Migraine headaches Migraine Symptom Assessment

At a championship football game, a player was slow to get up and was clearly disoriented as he made his way to the sidelines. The athletic trainer suspected a potential ocular-motor impairment, and immediately used EYE-SYNC to confirm. The 60 second assessment showed massive eye movement saccades, with obvious evidence of the eye jumping ahead in incorrect prediction.

As a result, it was clear the player wasn’t safe to play the rest of the game. As part of the concussion management protocol, the athlete began a return to play progression the next day, where daily EYE-SYNC assessments measured improvements and readiness for further progression until he was approved to return to play.

image description rules out concussion, sends player to the National team

component assessment tool Result
Ocular-motor impairment EYE-SYNC Eye Tracking Normal
Vestibular-balance dysfunction EYE-SYNC Vestibular Normal
Cognitive fatigue EYE-SYNC SCAT5 Normal
Cervical Spine Clinical Assessment of Cervical Spine Abnormal – Treat

After practice, a soccer player reported a headache and dizziness. Suspecting a concussion, she reported to the athletic trainer, who immediately deployed EYE-SYNC. Results were normal. Subsequent SCAT3 testing also ruled out impairments related to vestibular-balance and cognitive function. Given these normal results, the athletic trainer became suspicious her symptoms may be of cervicogenic origin. Upon examination a C5/C6 cervical rotation and corresponding muscle spasm was found.

The athletic trainer provided manual therapy techniques to correct the cervical misalignment and alleviate muscle tension and spasm, and by the next morning the player was asymptomatic. By using EYE-SYNC, the athletic trainer was able to confidently identify the player’s symptoms were related to neck whiplash, treat it, and return the player to the field—just in time to join the U.S. National Team and score her first international goal.

image description gets star player back on the field

component assessment tool Result
Ocular-motor impairment EYE-SYNC Eye Tracking Normal
Vestibular-balance dysfunction EYE-SYNC Vestibular Normal
Cognitive fatigue EYE-SYNC SCAT5 Normal
Cervical Spine Clinical Assessment of Cervical Spine Normal
Migraine headaches/strong> Migraine Symptom Assessment Abnormal – Treat

The linchpin on the football team experienced a bad headache after several head-to-head collisions during the biggest game of the year. Removed from play during the second quarter, an EYE-SYNC assessment was completed that showed normal ocular-motor function.

Additional tests confirmed the athletic trainer’s suspicion that his symptoms were more closely related to the onset of a migraine headache, something the player had a history of suffering from. After further testing ruled out a head injury, the player was given a cup of coffee at halftime. Shortly after, he felt asymptomatic. He returned to play and scored the wining touchdown.

image description allows quick diagnosis and targeted treatment

component assessment tool Result
Ocular-motor impairment EYE-SYNC Eye Tracking Normal
Vestibular-balance dysfunction EYE-SYNC Vestibular Abnormal – Remove from play
Cognitive fatigue EYE-SYNC SCAT5
Cervical Spine Clinical Assessment of Cervical Spine

During a meet, the undefeated 125lb freshman wrestling sensation was thrown to the mat by his opponent, landing on the side of his face. At the conclusion of the round, the wrestler called a medical timeout and reported nausea, dizziness, and feeling imbalanced. The team athletic trainer immediately deployed EYE-SYNC, suspecting some level of impairment. However, the results were normal. Now suspecting a vestibular-balance dysfunction, the athletic trainer quickly assessed the wrestler with components of the VOMS. This made the wrestler feel worse, and as a result, the athletic trainer decided to discontinue the match.

Additional tests determined the wrestler had developed visual motion sensitivity (VMS), meaning he would need to undergo a specific and more intensive rehabilitation program in the coming days to improve dynamic balance and orientation before he could resume wrestling. This targeted approach allowed the wrestler to return ten days later – just prior to the NCAA championships – where he placed 2nd.

Serving

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